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Fortnum & Mason - Piccadilly since 1707

Fortnum & Mason - Piccadilly since 1707

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  • A World Record Scotch Egg

Fortnum's broke the record - the biggest Scotch Egg in the World



He did it! On Tuesday 19 April in Fortnum’s demonstration kitchen, chef Luke Turner attempted to make the biggest scotch egg in history. His aim was to create a 7kg snack, beating the previous world record of 6.2kg (about the size of a slightly flattened football). At the centre was a whole ostrich egg, boiled for 90 minutes; around it a layer of prime pork sausagemeat; and the finishing touch was a light and crispy coat of breadcrumbs, delicately seasoned. Despite its cumbersome size, this was a first-class egg in every detail. The record was broken at 6.955kg - watch the video above to see how it all happened.

"Fortnum’s archives show that it invented the scotch egg in the first place, so it seems only fitting that it should produce the largest in the world, too."

But why attempt it at all, one might ask? Well, Fortnum’s archives show that it invented the scotch egg in the first place, so it seems only fitting that it should produce the largest in the world, too. Back in the 1730s, Fortnum’s was hard at work creating foods to suit its well-heeled customers, whose far-flung families could only be reached by long-distance carriage rides. Portable snacks were in demand, so Fortnum’s came up with a number of ideas, including wrapping a hard-boiled egg – which in those days was probably a pullet’s egg – in sausagemeat and coating it in fried breadcrumbs. Substantial, tasty and full of protein, it was an excellent way to stave off hunger pangs. (Its name, by the way, has nothing to do with Scotland; ‘scotched’ was merely another word for ‘processed’.)

Since then it has become a classic British food, although the poorer-quality versions found languishing on service station shelves haven’t done much for its gourmet credentials. But recently the scotch egg has been enjoying a comeback, turning up on restaurant and gastro pub menus in all kinds of guises – made with pickled eggs, black pudding, pureed crayfish and so on – just part of the growing tendency among chefs to rediscover the merits of many classic British foods. But here at Fortnum’s we have never lost faith in the humble scotch egg. Ours are freshly made with the finest ingredients, which does make quite a difference and would be a revelation to anyone who has only eaten the cheaper kind before. And we do like to reinvent it from time to time – we’ve made them with duck, hen, quail, goose and even ostrich eggs at the centre; we’ve mixed haggis with the sausagemeat for a more Scottish scotch egg; and, this year, we’ve invented an entirely new recipe of salmon in place of sausagemeat, flavoured with coriander and sweet chilli and wrapped around a quail’s egg – a deliciously light version that’s just right for a summer lunchbox.

"But here at Fortnum’s we have never lost faith in the humble scotch egg. Ours are freshly made with the finest ingredients, which does make quite a difference and would be a revelation to anyone who has only eaten the cheaper kind before."

So what goes into a Fortnum’s scotch egg? First, the egg must be free range – all our eggs from quail to ostrich are laid in the UK by free-range birds, raised by Clarence Court, which also supplies Buckingham Palace. In addition to the ethical benefits, free-range eggs have a richer and tastier yolk than their standard equivalents. The sausagemeat is from British pigs, bred outdoors in Berkshire, and the breadcrumbs are light and crispy, not dense and soft, as they so often are in pre-packaged scotch eggs. Packed into pretty eau de nil boxes, Fortnum’s scotch eggs are a credit to their long history - and the perfect ingredient for a summer picnic.

Fortnum’s scotch eggs are available loose from the delicatessen counter or can be purchased online. The varieties include Haggis Quail, Asian Quail, Hen, Duck, Goose and Ostrich. Please click here for more information.

Fortnum’s are also stocking all sorts of excellent free-range eggs, including quail, gull, pheasant, guinea fowl, goose, turkey, duck, rhea and ostrich. Some are available to purchase online; for the remainder please visit our Piccadilly store.

Duck Scotch Egg Recipe

Makes 1. Preparation time 15 minutes. Cooking time 15 minutes.

Ingredients 

1 x Duck egg
60g Fortnum & Mason fountain sausage meat skin off
80g Panko breadcrumbs
1 x Hen egg beaten
40g x Flour
1lt x Rapeseed oil

Equipment needed

1 x Small pan
1 x Timer
1 x Slotted spoon
1 x deep fat fryer
4 x 2lt Bowls

Method

1. In the small pan bring some water to the boil.
2. Once the water is boiling place the egg in the water and boil for 8 minutes.
3. Take the egg out and place in a bowl and run under cold water for 5 minutes.
4. Take the egg out and peel.
 

Scotch Eggs

5. Take the four separate bowls and put the flour, beaten egg, panko breadcumbs and sausage meat.
6. Preheat the fryer to 220 °C
 

Scotch Eggs

7. Roll the egg in the flour, then slightly oil the hands and create a patty from the sausage meat.

Scotch Eggs

8. Enclose the egg with sausage meat ensuring all the egg is covered.
9. Place back in the flour, then egg and then roll in the breadcrumbs then back into the egg and roll again in the breadcrumbs.

Scotch Eggs

10. Place the bread crumbed egg into the fryer for 8 minutes. 
11. Eat!

To see the full range of our fresh foods and groceries, please click here or call in at 181 Piccadilly and browse around our Food Halls.